fbpx
Making Sense of DoD 8570 and 8140 for Your Cyber Security Career

Making Sense of DoD 8570 and 8140 for Your Cyber Security Career

If you’re confused about U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) directives 8140, 8570, and 8570.01-M, don’t worry! You’re not alone. These directives may seem confusing, but they’re actually pretty easy to understand.

For those who are interested in information technology, DoD 8140 is actually a huge opportunity. As the DoD increases its focus on cyber security, thousands of jobs for trained individuals will be created. And in the coming years, many other organizations and businesses are likely to follow the DoD’s lead and begin requiring similar certifications for their employees to help ensure their information security.

DoD 8570 Compliance

DoD 8570 (technically 8570.1) compliance is required of all authorized users of DoD information systems, including military service members, contractors, and government employees. If you’ve been searching for cyber security jobs, chances are you’ve seen a listing with DoD 8570 compliance requirements.

Signed August 15, 2004, DoD 8570 is a directive that requires American National Standards Institute (ANSI) accredited certification for information assurance workers. You can achieve compliance by achieving specific IT certifications. DoD 8570 established three levels of certification requirements for Information Assurance Management (IAM) and Information Assurance Technicians (IAT). IAM roles are typically in a management or leadership position, whereas IAT roles are actively working with controlled information or on the networks that carry it. If you want to qualify for DoD Information Assurance jobs, you must obtain one of the certifications required for that position category or specialty and level.

IAT Level 1 IAT Level II IAT Level III
A+ CE
CCNASecurity
Network+ CE
SSCP
CCNA Security
CySA+ **
GICSP
GSEC
Security+ CE
SSCP
CASP + CE
CCNP Security
CISA
CISSP (or Associate)
GCED
GCIH
IAM Level 1 IAM Level II IAM Level III
CAP
GSLC
Security+ CE
CAP
CASP+ CE
CISM
CISSP (or Associate)
CISM
CISSP (or Associate)
GSLC
CCISO
IASAE 1 IASAE II IASAE III
CASP+ CE
CISSP (Or Associate)
CSSLP
CASP+ CE
CISSP (or Associate)
CSSLP
CISSP – ISSAP
CISSP – ISSEP
CSSP Analyst CSSP Infrastructure Support CSSP Incident Responder1
CEH
CFR
CCNA Cyber Ops
CCNA-Security
CySA+ **
GCIA
GCIH
GICSP
SCYBER
CEH
CySA+ **
GICSP
SSCP
CHFI
CFR
CFR
CEH
CFR
CCNA Cyber Ops
CCNA-Security
CHFI
CySA+ **
GCFA
GCIH
SCYBER
CSSP Auditor CSSP Manager1
CEH
CySA+ **
CISA
GSNA
CFR
CISM
CISSP-ISSMP
CCISO

 

DoD 8140: A New Focus on Cyber Security

Recently, officials realized there was a need to change the way the DoD handled information and network security. Changes in those technologies since 2004 and an increase in cyber attacks were the driving force behind this new directive. On August 11, 2015, the 8140 DoD directive was signed by representatives of the U.S. Department of Defense. Because of this change of focus, the “Information Assurance (IA) Workforce” has been renamed to the “Cybersecurity Workforce.”

DoD 8140 confirms the importance of popular IT certifications like A+, Network+, Security+, and CISSP as well as adding new approved baseline cyber security certifications including CASP, CEH, and more.

So is DoD 8570 really gone?

Not exactly. DoD Directive 8140 “reissues, renumbers, and cancels DoD Directive (DoDD) 8570.01 to update and expand established policies and assigned responsibilities for managing the DoD cyberspace workforce” according to the Information Assurance Support Environment site. Despite this, DoD 8140 currently uses the DoD 8570 manual.

DoD 8140 will eventually have its own manual, but it takes a few years to create complex manuals like this. For this reason, the DoD will continue using the 8570 manual, called 8570.01-M, for the time being. When a new manual is released for 8140 it will most likely replace 8570.01-M.

One of the major changes that DoD 8140 will bring about once its new manual is released is more of a focus on training that includes live, hands-on exercises. The DoD wanted to make sure that the certifications required for the Cybersecurity Workforce give their holders not just the knowledge, but also the know-how to defend the United States’ networks, digital assets, and information.

How might DoD 8140 affect you?

For many IT professionals, and those interested in IT, this presents a huge opportunity. With the DoD’s increased focus on cybersecurity, certified individuals are in high demand. DoD contractors operate all over the United States and even abroad, which makes it easy to take your credentials just about anywhere and get hired.

For those who are serving in the military, DoD 8140 (and 8570 before it) provides a way to gain valuable experience that translates directly into a lucrative civilian career. If you can work in the Cybersecurity Workforce during your service, you’ll come out of your military career with military clearance and certifications that will give you a huge head start in the civilian world.

For training companies (like LeaderQuest) and certification vendors alike, DoD 8140 is a huge call to action. This directive has made the importance of hands-on training and “live-fire drills” very clear. As a cyber security training company, we want to make sure that you’re well prepared to use your skills in the real world, and not leaving with just “book learning.”

Are you interested in joining the Cybersecurity Workforce?

There’s never been a better time to train in cyber security, whether or not you’re interested in working for the DoD. This industry currently has a huge shortage of qualified workers. In the U.S. alone, over 40,000 jobs for information security analysts are going unfilled every year, and employers are struggling to fill 200,000 other cyber security related roles, according to CyberSeek. With demand for these professionals at record levels, you can be sure that getting certified will pay off in spades.

The LeaderQuest cyber security school offers high-velocity IT training programs that can help you complete your information security certifications and be job-ready in weeks. Day and night class schedules make it easy for you to get the training you need fast in a way that works with your schedule. You won’t leave LeaderQuest with just a piece of paper. Our industry-expert instructors will make sure you have the knowledge you need to excel in a new job role, whether it’s through DoD 8570 or not.

Get started today, and make your new career a reality!

REQUEST MORE INFO

5 Ways Veterans Have a Professional Advantage in an IT Career

5 Ways Veterans Have a Professional Advantage in an IT Career

You spend years of your life in the dedication and protection of your country and the people you love, only to return home after all that hard work to a job market that doesn’t know how to value your dedication and evaluate the learning you’ve already done.

A corporate IT career path is about as different from the military promotion system as civilian life here in the US is from the time you spent as a soldier overseas.

You send in countless resumes only to get back one rejection email after another… without so much as a chance to meet someone for a face-to-face interview to show them how capable you really are.

It’s totally unfair, we know.

And it’s frustrating. Beyond frustrating.

But the silver lining is, there’s always, always a way to swing your military experience in your favor without making life-long desk jockeys uncomfortable around you or sounding like that old man down the street who sits on his porch with a shotgun and a can of warm beer talking about his own good old days in the Army.

Because the truth of it is, your status as a veteran and your experience in the military are an advantage in the IT job market… you’ve just got to do some reverse-engineered thinking to figure out how to put a spin on things so your resume, cover letter, and interview make you a no-brainer to hire.

Here’s what we mean:

1. Incredible Attention to Detail is Needed for an IT Career

In the military, those tiny details you had to pay close attention to and worry over could literally make the difference between life and death.

Information Technology, though usually not life-threatening in any way, is what it is because of the small details and the attention to how to optimize even the smallest things for the greater good.

It’d be rare to find a non-veteran with the respect and attention towards even the smallest details that you’ve had to learn in your time in the armed forces.

2. Post 9/11 GI Bill® = IT Training for Veterans

The desk jockeys of corporate America may not realize the gravity of the work you’ve done in the military (try not to hold it against them). But they almost always respect the desire for quality education.

As a veteran, one of the best advantages you have access to is the Post 9/11 GI Bill®. You can fund some quality IT career training and IT certifications for yourself once you get out of the military to get a head start in your civilian IT career.

If you’ve already used it, flaunt that shamelessly. Show off that you dove head-first into an IT education so you’d be able to do the best job possible once you landed a new IT career.

If you haven’t used it yet and you know what IT field you want to go into, you can add to your resume when you’ll be starting your new educational program, or even just mention what you’ll be using your GI Bill® for.

If the reason you’re reading this article is that you are currently considering all of your different options, be sure to read “5 Reasons Why Veterans Make Perfect Network Security Administrators.”


Pro IT Career TipPro tip: If the company you want to work for doesn’t have any openings, ask for a 30-minute informational interview, presenting yourself as a veteran interested in their line of work. During the interview, you can ask for suggestions on which IT certifications for veterans to pursue and what programs they recommend. Keep in touch with your interviewer thanking them for their time and again when you’ve enrolled in an IT training program. It’ll keep you top-of-mind for when a new position opens.


3. Leadership Is Your Way of Life

Confidence, being able to take charge to solve technology problems, and a having a knack for creating workable solutions are some of the best assets you can have in the IT world!

In the military, leadership gets ingrained into you at a much younger age than most young people who go directly into a corporate IT career path.

For example, most people join the military rather young (some at only 18), so by the time you’re 22 (the age most people graduate from college), you’ve already got a couple of years of experience leading and managing a team of people.

Most corporate hiring managers don’t realize this, though, so make sure you carefully point it out on your resume.

4. No-Nonsense Management Systems

Along with early leadership, the army and the other branches of the armed forces do not mess around with wasting time, money, or resources when it comes to getting things done.

There might be a bit of puffery in the corporate world that you’re not used to, but at the end of the day, the main decision-makers of any company are looking to run their businesses with that kind of no-nonsense, goal-achieving work system you learned in the military.

So while your fellow entry-level tech colleagues may not ‘get it,’ your bosses and managers definitely will.

5. Perseverance & Calm Thinking During Chaos

To say things get chaotic in an office environment after the things you’ve experienced in the army may seem like a bit of a joke to you.

But when there’s loads of money on the line for one particular business deal, tensions can run pretty high between co-workers if it looks like things might not be going your way and the deal might be lost.

Or, particularly in cyber security, if you’ve got a hacker that’s advancing quickly and you can’t seem to figure out what to do to stop him, panic can quickly take over for the average IT professional. But not you…your training gives you the ability to think clearly and react better, which makes cyber security training for veterans a good fit!

You’ve been taught how to persevere when things get tough (heck, most of your corporate colleagues probably couldn’t make it through boot camp), and you know how to calm your mind to think progressively and analytically during chaotic situations to come to the smartest course of action possible.

Revamp Your Resume & Start Advancing to Your IT Career

Another thing that’s different from the military in the corporate world is speaking in “I” instead of “we.”

The military is all about group honor and value, which is great. But when you’re getting hired in the corporate world, it matters less what your group as a whole accomplished and more what you did individually to contribute to your group’s success.

So while you might have the right information on your résumé, you’d be surprised what a difference in wording could do for you!

And while we’ve only listed five here, the University of Colorado made a list of 21 advantages you can easily list out on your resume and cover letter as a veteran, depending on the job in IT that you’re going after.

For more help revamping your resume to get hired quickly into the career path you want, check out our IT career services and our free 10-step checklist that walks you through a successful job search.


LeaderQuest IT Training

Did You Know?

LeaderQuest students always receive IT career and resume counseling as part of their IT Career Training program! Call (866) 378-0761 for more information today.


GI Bill® is a registered trademark of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA).