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The Most Lucrative IT Careers for 2020

The Most Lucrative IT Careers for 2020

It’s clear that Information Technology is a fast growing field with lots of opportunity. According to (ISC)2’s Cybersecurity Workforce Study 2019, which polled more than 3,000 cyber and IT professionals, the current cybersecurity workforce in the United States and 10 other world economies at 2.8 million – about 4 million short of what it needs to be. LeaderQuest is proud to help train the next generation of IT specialists and cybersecurity pros.

Considering that IT workers are needed in nearly every sector of industry, it’s no surprise that these roles are growing like crazy. Salaries are also increasing at high rates, with Information Technology Managers seeing their compensation rise by over 8% from 2015-2019.

So what does this mean for IT? In this examination of the Robert Half 2020 Technology & IT Salary Guide, we’ll be exploring areas of growth, examining average salaries, and reviewing other information that’s essential for anyone thinking of getting into IT.

Expanding IT Industries

Though the need for IT is rising everywhere, the three industries with the biggest demand are healthcare, financial services, and manufacturing.

  • Healthcare — Big innovations are needed to improve patient care by modernizing healthcare operations.
  • Financial services — In the wake of the Equifax breach, this shouldn’t be surprising. Both big data and information security initiatives drive the need for pros in this industry.
  • Manufacturing — While manufacturing has been slow to adapt, things are changing quickly with the trend toward automation.
  • Technology — Unsurprisingly, the tech industry has a huge and growing need for all kinds of information technology roles.

The most in-demand job roles include:

Highly Valued Technology Certifications

Certifications are always in high demand as a way for employers to verify the skills of a new hire. The skills and knowledge required to pass these exams give employers confidence that they’ve made the right hire.

IT Salaries for 2020

In Robert Half’s extensive salary guide, they break down the numbers for what people in the 25th, 50th, 75th, and 95th percentile will make. Which percentile an individual falls into is decided by things like level of experience, special skills/expertise, job complexity, location, and other such factors.

When looking at these charts for yourself, it’s important to remember that the 50th percentile represents the midpoint. Those just getting started in the industry will be closer to (or below) the 25th percentile. Those with a lot of experience or credentials would fall in the 75th or 95th percentiles. For more information on using the salary guide, check out the video below.

When you examine the chart below, you can see that IT salaries top out with executive positions such as the Chief Information Officer ($174,750 – $298,750), Chief Technology Officer ($152,250 – $266,000), and Chief Security Officer ($155,250 – $278,000).

While that’s the highest of the high, it’s still worth noting that many of the salary ranges for IT roles easily reach over $100,000 including specialties and years of experience. Here are just a few high paying jobs in technical services, networking, and security.

Technical Services, Help Desk, & Technical Support

As you can see from the chart below, these positions represent the lower end of the salary range in IT. However, with the midpoint salary range for most positions around or over $50,000, it’s still much more than a living wage.

While salaries start in the $34,000 to $40,000 range, they quickly move to $50,000 – $60,000 as they get more and more specialized. This is especially true for systems administrators and systems engineers.

Position Title 25th Percentile 50th Percentile 75th Percentile 95th Percentile
Help Desk Tier 1 $34,250 $40,500 $47,500 $56,750
Help Desk Tier 2 $41,500 $50,000 $56,500 $65,250
Help Desk Tier 3 $50,500 $60,250 $72,000 $83,000
Desktop Support Analyst $49,750 $61,500 $73,500 $86,500
Systems Administrator $69,250 $84,750 $102,750 $117,250
Manager $107,500 $130,250 $157,750 $185,250
Systems Engineer $88,750 $106,000 $125,750 $148,000

When you’re looking to get into IT for the first time, it’s important to have a base of knowledge to draw upon. Our Computer User Support Specialist program combines popular ITIL® and CompTIA training programs necessary to develop the skills you’ll need for entry-level IT.

If you’re looking to get started in IT with little to no experience. Learn more about us by clicking the link below.

Contact Us!

Networking/Telecommunications

Network Administrators are listed as one of the most in-demand positions for 2020, so it should be no surprise their salaries range from $76,250 to $129,500, but that’s just the tip of the iceberg.

Many higher level network positions such as Network Engineers, Managers, or Wireless Network Engineers start around $105,000 and can go as high as the $178,750.

Position Title 25th Percentile 50th Percentile 75th Percentile 95th Percentile
NOC Technician $53,750 $64,500 $79,250 $101,750
Telecommunications Specialist $60,000 $72,250 $86,000 $101,250
Network/Cloud Administrator $76,250 $92,500 $110,250 $129,500
Telecommunications Manager $83,750 $103,750 $120,500 $140,000
Network/Cloud Engineer $94,750 $112,000 $134,500 $159,000
Network/Cloud Manager $97,500 $120,000 $141,750 $169,750
Wireless Network Engineer $105,000 $123,750 $148,750 $178,750
Network/Cloud Architect $117,500 $141,750 $169,500 $196,250

If you’re interested in the networking positions, our Network Support Specialist Program teaches fundamentals, competencies, and qualifications that are necessary to start a career in networking. Through these classes, you’ll learn how to install, configure, run, verify, and troubleshoot medium-sized networks.

Interested in learning more? Click the link below.

Contact Us

Security

Cyber security is rapidly expanding and in desperate need of more professionals to stay on top of security. The compensation for these roles reflects this high demand.

In cyber security, even the jobs in the 25th percentile start around $90,000. With rising concerns about data from the Equifax breaches and others, it makes sense that Network Security Engineers, Data Security Analysts, and Information Systems Security Managers most often make between $115,000 and $160,000.

Position Title 25th Percentile 50th Percentile 75th Percentile 95th Percentile
Network Security Administrator $94,750 $113,500 $137,000 $160,500
Systems Security Administrator $93,750 $112,250 $134,750 $159,750
Network Security Engineer $101,500 $119,750 $143,000 $168,500
Data Security Analyst $108,250 $129,000 $154,000 $183,500
Information Systems Security Manager $119,500 $143,250 $172,250 $205,750

With the gap between cyber skills growing wider by the day, the industry provides professionals with unparalleled job security and a world of opportunities. Whether you’re interested in working on securing networks, keeping data safe, or even getting inside the mind of a hacker, cyber provides a variety of great, high-paying options.

Interested in learning more about how our programs can help you build a career path toward cyber security? Click the button below.

Learn More!

Perks, Incentives, and More

Most IT positions include generous benefits packages. Here are the most common benefits broken down by the percentage of companies that offer them:

  • Medical Insurance (81%)
  • Paid Time Off (76%)
  • Dental Insurance (71%)
  • Vision Insurance (63%)
  • Retirement Savings Plan (65%)

Employers also consider a number of other incentives to snag top talent including signing bonuses, health insurance, generous vacation time, and professional development opportunities.

As for perks, places often offer flexible work schedules, social events, the option of telecommuting, paid parental leave, employee discounts, onsite gym or access to a gym offsite, a compressed schedule, or free/subsidized meals.

Importance of Certifications

Ultimately, the difference in salary comes down to specialization. For IT pros, that means skills and certifications. Both increase the marketability of a professional. Employers may increase salaries between five to ten percent for professionals with sought-after skills and abilities.

Some of the most popular certifications, as identified by the Robert Half guide, include CISSP, CCNA, CompTIA A+, and PMP®. However, certifications show more than proving a skillset. They also signal to employers that a professional is committed to keeping their skills up to date at all times. With the ever-widening cyber security gap, certifications and willingness to keep on top of the latest updates are becoming more and more of a commodity.

Certifications can mean the difference between thousands of dollars in salary. That’s why, at LeaderQuest, we balance by-the-book training that helps people pass their exams with real-world, hands-on experience. This ensures our students can take their learning beyond the classroom and be fully prepared for a brand new career.

We understand the pressures of working full-time while still wanting to advance education and earning potential That’s why we offer classes during the day, at night, on campus, or online to meet any schedule and learning style.

Ultimately, a certification is a great, cost-effective way to get into the lucrative IT field for the fraction of the cost of a university. With the continuing upward trend in salaries, the IT industry isn’t going anywhere anytime soon.

If you’re interested in building a successful career in IT, contact us and we’ll get you set up with one of our expert career advisers.

Contact us today and unlock your career’s full potential!

PMI, PMP, CAPM, and PMBOK are registered marks of Project Management Institute, Inc.

The Most Lucrative IT Careers for 2019

The Most Lucrative IT Careers for 2019

It’s no secret that IT is exploding. Forbes has  predicted as many as 3.5 million unfilled positions in the cyber security industry by 2021.

Given this scarcity, it’s no surprise that the salaries for IT professionals are skyrocketing, but the size of that jump might be more than you expect. Salaries for software developers and information security analysts increased 17 percent and 18 percent respectively since 2013 while compensation for computer systems analysts rose a whopping 21 percent.

So what does this mean for IT? In this examination of the Robert Half 2019 Technology & IT Salary Guide, we’ll be exploring areas of growth, examining average salaries, and reviewing other information that’s essential for anyone thinking of getting into IT.

Counteract Inexperience with Quick Learning

As the world shifts towards automation, the need for talented IT professionals is far outstripping the supply. That’s why companies have become willing to hire professionals with less experience but who are motivated to learn quickly.

With technology evolving faster than ever, employers are also looking for new hires who can stay on top of technology in their own time. That means passion is a big selling point.

On the flip side, those with skills and techniques related cloud technology, open source practices, mobile development, big data, cyber security, and other new technologies will definitely be given preference in hiring.

Expanding IT Industries

Though the need for IT is rising everywhere, the three industries with the biggest demand are healthcare, financial services, and manufacturing.

  • Healthcare — Big innovations are needed to improve patient care by modernizing healthcare operations.
  • Financial services — In the wake of the Equifax breach, this shouldn’t be surprising. Both big data and information security initiatives drive the need for pros in this industry.
  • Manufacturing — While manufacturing has been slow to adapt, things are changing quickly with the trend toward automation.
  • Software as a Service (SaaS) — This industry is growing quickly as more companies leave traditional software behind for tailored solutions with great support.

The most in-demand job roles include:

Highly Valued Technology Certifications

Certifications are always in high demand as a way for employers to verify the skills of a new hire. The skills and knowledge required to pass these exams give employers confidence that they’ve made the right hire.

IT Salaries for 2019

In Robert Half’s extensive salary guide, they break down the numbers for what people in the 25th, 50th, 75th, and 95th percentile will make. Which percentile an individual falls into is decided by things like level of experience, special skills/expertise, job complexity, location, and other such factors.

When looking at these charts for yourself, it’s important to remember that the 50th percentile represents the midpoint. Those just getting started in the industry will be closer to (or below) the 25th percentile. Those with a lot of experience or credentials would fall in the 75th or 95th percentiles. For more information on using the salary guide, check out the video below.

When you examine the chart below, you can see that IT salaries top out with executive positions such as the Chief Information Officer ($171,750 – $293,000), Chief Technology Officer ($147,750 – $263,000), and Chief Security Officer ($148,000 – $270,000).

While that’s the highest of the high, it’s still worth noting that many of the salary ranges for IT roles easily reach over $100,000 including specialties and years of experience. Here are just a few high paying jobs in technical services, networking, and security.

Technical Services, Help Desk, & Technical Support

As you can see from the chart below, these positions represent the lower end of the salary range in IT. However, with the midpoint salary range for most positions around or over $50,000, it’s still much more than a living wage.

While salaries start in the $30,000 to $40,000 range, they quickly move to $50,000 – $60,000 as they get more and more specialized. This is especially true for systems administrators and systems engineers.

Position Title

25th Percentile

50th Percentile

75th Percentile

95th Percentile

Help Desk Tier 1

$32,250

$38,750

$46,000

$55,000

Help Desk Tier 2

$38,250

$45,750

$54,750

$64,500

Help Desk Tier 3

$49,000

$58,500

$70,000

$82,750

Desktop Support Analyst

$51,000

$61,250

$73,250

$86,500

Systems Administrator

$68,000

$81,750

$97,750

$115,750

Manager

$82,000

$98,500

$117,750

$139,000

Systems Engineer

$86,250

$103,000

$123,250

$145,750

When you’re looking to get into IT for the first time, it’s important to have a base of knowledge to draw upon. Our Computer User Support Specialist program combines popular ITIL® and CompTIA training programs necessary to develop the skills you’ll need for entry-level IT.

If you’re looking to get started in IT with little to no experience. Learn more about us by clicking the link below.

Contact Us!

Networking/Telecommunications

Network Administrators are listed as one of the most in-demand positions for 2019, so it should be no surprise their salaries range from $74,000 to $126,000, but that’s just the tip of the iceberg.

Many higher level network positions such as Network Engineers, Managers, or Wireless Network Engineers start around $90,000 to $100,000 and can go as high as the $150,000 to $160,000 range.

Position Title

25th Percentile

50th Percentile

75th Percentile

95th Percentile

NOC Technician

$52,250

$62,500

$77,000

$98,750

Telecommunications Specialist

$59,500

$71,500

$85,250

$100,750

Network Administrator

$74,750

$89,000

$106,750

$126,750

Telecommunications Manager

$79,750

$95,500

$114,500

$136,000

Network Engineer

$92,000

$108,750

$130,500

$154,250

Network Manager

$94,750

$113,500

$135,750

$162,000

Wireless Network Engineer

$102,000

$122,000

$146,250

$173,500

Network Architect

$114,00

$137,500

$164,500

$195,000

If you’re interested in the networking positions, our Network Support Specialist Program teaches fundamentals, competencies, and qualifications that are necessary to start a career in networking. Through these classes, you’ll learn how to install, configure, run, verify, and troubleshoot medium-sized networks.

Interested in learning more? Click the link below.

Contact Us

Security

Cyber security is rapidly expanding and in desperate need of more professionals to stay on top of security. The compensation for these roles reflects this high demand.

In cyber security, even the jobs in the 25th percentile start around $90,000. With rising concerns about data from the Equifax breaches and others, it makes sense that Network Security Engineers, Data Security Analysts, and Information Systems Security Managers most often make between $115,000 and $160,000.

Position Title

25th Percentile

50th Percentile

75th Percentile

95th Percentile

Network Security Administrator

$93,000

$111,500

$134,000

$158,750

Systems Security Administrator

$93,750

$112,250

$134,750

$159,750

Network Security Engineer

$98,500

$118,000

$141,750

$167,500

Data Security Analyst

$105,000

$125,250

$149,500

$178,250

Information Systems Security Manager

$116,000

$139,000

$167,250

$199,750

With the gap between cyber skills growing wider by the day, the industry provides professionals with unparalleled job security and a world of opportunities. Whether you’re interested in working on securing networks, keeping data safe, or even getting inside the mind of a hacker, cyber provides a variety of great, high-paying options.

Interested in learning more about how our programs can help you build a career path toward cyber security? Click the button below.

Learn More!

Perks, Incentives, and More

Most IT positions include generous benefits packages. Here are the most common benefits broken down by the percentage of companies that offer them:

  • Medical Insurance (88%)
  • Paid Time Off (80%)
  • Dental Insurance (71%)
  • Vision Insurance (60%)
  • Disability Insurance (58%)
  • Life insurance (53%)
  • Employee Assistance Programs (39%)

Employers also consider a number of other incentives to snag top talent including signing bonuses, health insurance, generous vacation time, and professional development opportunities.

As for perks, places often offer flexible work schedules, social events, the option of telecommuting, onsite gym or access to a gym offsite, a compressed schedule, or free/subsidized meals.

In addition, employers offer 14 days paid vacation for the first five years of employment and nine paid holidays including floating holidays. Employers also match 3-4 percent of employees’ 401(k) or Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP) contributions on average.

Importance of Certifications

Ultimately, the difference in salary comes down to specialization. For IT pros, that means skills and certifications. Both increase the marketability of a professional. Employers may increase salaries between five to ten percent for professionals with sought-after skills and abilities.

Some of the most popular certifications, as identified by the Robert Half guide, include CISSP, CCNA, CompTIA A+, and PMP®. However, certifications show more than proving a skillset. They also signal to employers that a professional is committed to keeping their skills up to date at all times. With the ever-widening cyber security gap, certifications and willingness to keep on top of the latest updates are becoming more and more of a commodity.

Certifications can mean the difference between thousands of dollars in salary. That’s why, at LeaderQuest, we balance by-the-book training that helps people pass their exams with real-world, hands-on experience. This ensures our students can take their learning beyond the classroom and be fully prepared for a brand new career.

We understand the pressures of working full-time while still wanting to advance education and earning potential That’s why we offer classes during the day, at night, on campus, or online to meet any schedule and learning style.

Ultimately, a certification is a great, cost-effective way to get into the lucrative IT field for the fraction of the cost of a university. With the continuing upward trend in salaries, the IT industry isn’t going anywhere anytime soon.

If you’re interested in building a successful career in IT, contact us and we’ll get you set up with one of our expert career advisers.

Contact us today and unlock your career’s full potential!

Contact Us!

PMI, PMP, CAPM, and PMBOK are registered marks of Project Management Institute, Inc.

Is Your Resume Holding You Back from a Great IT Career?

Is Your Resume Holding You Back from a Great IT Career?

Anybody who has ever been out job hunting can tell you first hand that there is probably nothing more frustrating than trying to come up with a compelling resume. The one thing that many people need reminded of is that you cannot expect one resume format to have the same effect in different fields. Different employers under different careers appreciate different values and skills. IT is a field where the way you write your resume will play a major role in determining whether or not you even get to the interview! So after investing your time and money in IT career training and IT certification, you need to make sure that you have one heck of a resume if you plan on making it in the business.

Tips to Write a Compelling Resume for an IT Position

Most employers in the IT business value skill and creativity above other traits in a potential employee. These two qualities quite literally fuel the industry. It is therefore very important to come up with a resume that shines a spotlight on the presence of these two and many other skills that the employer stands to gain from by hiring you. Below are five simple tips on how to write an attention grabbing IT resume that will leave your interviewers in awe.

1. Be Organized and Draw Attention to the Major Points

The people given the duty of reviewing resumes are usually inundated by how many they receive. In fact, research has shown that they can spend as little as 25 seconds on each in order to save time! How much can YOU read in 25 seconds? It is extremely important that you organize your work in such a way that the big points are hard to miss. Short sentences, bullet points, selective bolding, and highlighting can be extremely helpful in making the important points stand out in a short time. Also be sure that your information is well-spaced so it is easy to scan. These simple tips help by creating an illusion that of less work for the interviewer and increase the chances of your resume being read through properly.

2. Quantify Your Accomplishments

In IT, many people applying for the same job as you will probably have similar IT career training. This means that it is not enough to just mention your alma mater and former places of work. However, not all applicants may have IT certifications. Industry recognized IT certifications help to “prove” you have the abilities and skills you say you have. If you have IT certifications, make sure they are prominently featured.

Additional information on your achievements in the world of IT will also help give you an edge over your competitors. For example, if you have ever entered and won in an IT based competition or exhibition, you should definitely mention this. This gives the person reading the resume the impression that you are a go-getter with a healthy competitive spirit which is needed in the industry. Focus on achievements you have accomplished that help demonstrate your knowledge in the field you are applying for. You can also include certificates awarded for non-competitive achievements including short IT course programs and extra training.

3. Be Brief and Concise

As mentioned earlier, the employers do not have enough time on their hands to go through your entire resume, especially if it is a long one. Therefore, ensure that you focus only on what is important and relevant to the job you are applying for. Everything else can be a side note that can be discussed more in-depth at the interview level if they are interested in asking you about non-relevant experience and work. Be sure to highlight your skills, interests and achievements with brief but informative descriptions. This way, the person reviewing the resume gets to see just how amazing you are with a simple sweep over the page.

4. Mention Hobbies and Interests that are Relevant to IT Careers

Since IT industry employers love creativity and open mindedness, the hobbies and interest section of the resume can be important. Almost any hobby or interest can be molded to fit the IT business. For example, creativity can be shown with hobbies like painting, photography, and cooking. Team sports such as baseball, softball, football, hockey, etc. show that you can work as a team member in pursuit of a common goal. Sudoku, chess, and backgammon will highlight your logic skills. Reading and visiting museums can showcase your hunger for knowledge.

5. Use Correct Spelling and Grammar, Use Short Sentences

This might seem obvious but it is a commonly overlooked factor in resume writing. Grammatical errors, long redundant sentences and typos are every employer’s nightmare. If yours has a lot of these you can rest assured that it will not be handled with the seriousness and interest you would want. So make sure that these errors are not anywhere in your resume as you submit it.

The Bottom Line

After all is said and done, no one wants to go through years of IT career training and IT certification only to end up jobless simply because they had an inadequate resume. The tips above will help you come up with something that even the hardest employers to impress will find compelling. However, make sure that above all else, you are honest about your abilities and achievements. This way, you will have no fears or regrets when your amazing resume lands you that amazing IT career.

 


LeaderQuest IT Training

Are you missing some critical IT career training or IT certifications for that job you’ve been eyeing?

Contact LeaderQuest IT Training today! With free IT career services, we can help you carve out your path to IT career success.


 

Navigating an IT Company Hiring Spree: A Behind-the-Scenes Look

Navigating an IT Company Hiring Spree: A Behind-the-Scenes Look

Getting in on an IT company’s hiring spree can be one of the best ways to land a position that could eventually lead to your dream IT job.

Normally, when an IT company goes on a hiring spree, it can mean one of a few things… all of which are great for helping you develop your career:

  • They need to fill up desks/roles fast because they’ve taken on a huge new project
  • They’re expanding their business in a fundamental way
  • They’ve just seen a huge jump in revenue and are taking that opportunity to expand
  • They’ve got something new and innovative to show off to the world… and they don’t want their competitors beating them to the market

Whatever their reasons are though, they need to make quality hires as quickly as possible so they can get the ball rolling.

As a job seeker, this comes with its pros and cons.

And since we’ve seen IT hiring sprees happen from within, we can help you navigate through one so you can make sure you stand out in all the right ways.

You’ll be Treated Like a Herd of Cattle

Especially when an IT company is hiring for a lot of new people in the same position (like entry-level app developers), you might walk in to your first interview or testing session only to find that you’re one of 30 people they’re interviewing and testing for skills that day.

Do not let it deflate your sense of worthiness for the job.

Even if only 5-10 of those 30 people will be granted a position, it doesn’t mean the odds are any less in your favor. This is just the company’s way of saving time on their end, and it’s a way to filter out unworthy candidates quickly instead of taking the time to interview each individual candidate first.

Your Skills are Secondary

The testing and herd-like interviewing process is important (If you say you know C++, you need to prove it), but most importantly, the company is looking for candidates who stand out and resonate with the company culture.

Especially when mass-hiring for an entry-level position, your managers are expecting to spend time training you, and see you first and foremost as an investment for the long-run interest of the company.

So while your track record and your ability to prove that you can produce results is important, the most important thing in a candidate for them is someone who will be easy to get along with and who’s ready and willing to hit the ground running, even if it means making a mistake or two along the way.

Make Yourself Stand Out

To stand out and get the job, you can’t just walk into the office and act like a machine who’s only there to pump out work. Bragging about what you’ve done in the past is cool, but you don’t want to sound like work is the end-all be-all of your life. Working with someone like that is a turn-off.

Fortunately, there’s a few other ways you can stand out from your herd of fellow interviewers to help secure a second, more attention-worthy interview for the position.

  • Do your research to get a feel for the company’s culture
    •  By doing a few minutes of research on their website, reading their blog, and getting a feel for what others say about their working culture on sites like Glassdoor, you can get an idea of the company’s in-house working culture and at least have an idea of what you shouldn’t do to hurt your chances. For example, if the place is casual, don’t show up in a three-piece suit.
  • Contact your direct supervisor before the interviewing process begins
    • So many people get caught up in the idea that to make a good impression, you need to send a thank you card to the interviewer after the interview’s been conducted. There’s no harm in it, but the real time to make a good first impression is before and during the interview. If you don’t do it then, sending a card as a last-chance redemption is not going to work.
    • For tips on how to do this, check out our blog post on doing your own informal introductions.
  • Ask a current employee how to impress the interviewer
    • If you know someone working at the company, find out how you can impress the person who’s going to be interviewing you. (It may or may not be work related.)
    • If you don’t know anyone working there, don’t be shy to reach out to people who are already in the position you want to ask them what the interviewers are particularly looking for (as far as hard skills and a culture fit) that you can make sure to mention during your interview.
  • Have a killer example of hitting the ground running
    • As mentioned before, most IT companies on a hiring spree are doing so because they want to get to work fast. Having an example (related to your current skill set or not) of where you hit the ground running and came out on top is going to give you major brownie points as the go-getter they’re looking for.

Get Your Resume & Interview Skills Ready

At the end of the day, an IT company’s hiring spree is like a normal hiring routine, but much, much faster.

Knowing that your interviews and future managers want to move quickly will help you present the most impressive aspects of yourself that position you as a company fit and a go-getter.

If you know of an IT company who’s hiring soon and you want to make sure your resume and interview skills are good enough to stand out during a hiring spree, check out our Career Services for our career workshops, individual advising, and job networks.

Build a Results-Based Resume You Can be Proud Of

Build a Results-Based Resume You Can be Proud Of

Reading through a stack of resumes is boring… like sitting and listening to Charlie Brown’s teacher ramble all day long.

A big part of our advice on this blog has been to help you stand out as a job applicant so you can get noticed in a sea of faceless resumes.

This advice isn’t going to be any different.

You see, the reason reading resume after resume is so boring is because they’re all painfully the same. Sure, one person may have worked a year longer than another, but other than these tiny differentiators, it can be a tough call who will be a good fit for a new position because 99.99999% of all resumes lack any hint of pizzazz or personality.

The good news for you is that taking an extra 30 minutes to an hour on your resume to quantify your experience into numbers and emphasize the things you’ve accomplished will almost guarantee that your resume stands out from the rest.

Why Results-Based Resumes Rock

Results-based resumes showcase the results you’ve worked hard for and your value as a potential employee.

They show that you’re a go-getter—not just another desk-sitter and clock-watcher.

Results-based resumes work incredibly well for people who’ve had a slew of short-term contract positions and internships, or for people who explored something unrelated for a while. They’re also great for people who want to turn their hobbies into a career, because while they might not have a background of impressive ‘professional’ titles to slap on a piece of paper, they have accomplished some real things of worth.

How to Quantify Your Results

If you’ve already got a resume written out, take a look at it.

For each position you have listed, pick out one to two things you did that really blew the socks off your boss or your clients.

If you were a web developer at an SEO agency, how much faster did the websites load once you were finished with them?

If you worked as a security support analyst, how much time and money did the systems you put in place save your clients?

The types of numbers your future boss will care about the most boil down to three types of statistics: money, time, and percentile improvement. When you quantify your results, make sure it’s in one of these terms.

The CAR Format

CAR is an acronym to help you format and present the results-based sections of your resume. It stands for:

  • Challenge
  • Action
  • Results

If you stepped into a contract position and their internal database was a total mess, that’s your challenge. Action is what you did to fix it. And the results can include quantifying the improvement made on the database.

Formatting the Resume

Formatting the resume is important. For the most part, you don’t have to vary too far away from what people typically recommend for a standard resume.

Here’s the sections of a typical resume:

  • Name & Contact Information
  • Executive Summary
  • Core Proficiencies
  • Professional Experience
  • Education

If you like, you can merge the executive summary and core proficiencies into one section (still labeled along the lines of ‘executive summary’) that acts as a host for keywords present in the job description and a teaser to pique the interest of the HR manager to read further and set your resume in the ‘yes’ pile.

The professional experience section is where you want to shift your focus. Instead of being headstrong about doing everything in reverse chronological order and listing everything by job title, company, dates, and job responsibilities, you can make each section based on a specific ‘CAR.’

You’ll still want to mention what your job was an where you worked at the time, but those are secondary factors in comparison with the wow factor of the quantified result you were able to achieve that you’re showing off.

Considering the ATS

Honestly, unless you follow our advice and get to email your resume directly to your immediate supervisor, your resume will probably go through an applicant tracking system, or ATS.

These systems are there to scan your resume for keywords and to parse out details on your work history… which means they’re tailored for a typical reverse-chronological resume instead of your kick-ass results-based resume.

If you’re left with no other option than to submit your resume through an ATS, then you actually might want to format your results-based resume in the same way you’d format your typical resume.

The thing you’d want to change is the bullet points under each position you list to still show the CAR format of presenting information, with a heavy focus on the numbers. You might even want to bold the end results so they stand out more.

If you can work around the ATS and present a better formatted results-based resume to a real person, then do it. But if not, this is a nice secondary option that still focuses on results and adds some pizzaz to your resume and makes you more memorable than everyone else.

Be Proud of Your Resume – Flaunt it Shamelessly

Now that you’ve got an incredible results-based resume, be proud of it and flaunt it shamelessly in front of your network and anyone hiring for a job related to your skill set.

Send it in for the jobs you want, knowing that you’ve got a much higher chance of landing yourself in the ‘yes’ pile that gets called in for an interview than the hundreds of other lame, boring resumes that don’t showcase anything special.

If you want some help making your results-based resume even more impressive, check out our Career Services for scheduled career workshops and individual career advising.