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Making Sense of DoD 8570 and 8140 for Your Cyber Security Career

Making Sense of DoD 8570 and 8140 for Your Cyber Security Career

If you’re confused about U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) directives 8140, 8570, and 8570.01-M, don’t worry! You’re not alone. These directives may seem confusing, but they’re actually pretty easy to understand.

For those who are interested in information technology, DoD 8140 is actually a huge opportunity. As the DoD increases its focus on cyber security, thousands of jobs for trained individuals will be created. And in the coming years, many other organizations and businesses are likely to follow the DoD’s lead and begin requiring similar certifications for their employees to help ensure their information security.

DoD 8570 Compliance

DoD 8570 (technically 8570.1) compliance is required of all authorized users of DoD information systems, including military service members, contractors, and government employees. If you’ve been searching for cyber security jobs, chances are you’ve seen a listing with DoD 8570 compliance requirements.

Signed August 15, 2004, DoD 8570 is a directive that requires American National Standards Institute (ANSI) accredited certification for information assurance workers. You can achieve compliance by achieving specific IT certifications. DoD 8570 established three levels of certification requirements for Information Assurance Management (IAM) and Information Assurance Technicians (IAT). IAM roles are typically in a management or leadership position, whereas IAT roles are actively working with controlled information or on the networks that carry it. If you want to qualify for DoD Information Assurance jobs, you must obtain one of the certifications required for that position category or specialty and level.

IAT Level 1 IAT Level II IAT Level III
A+ CE
CCNASecurity
Network+ CE
SSCP
CCNA Security
CySA+ **
GICSP
GSEC
Security+ CE
SSCP
CASP + CE
CCNP Security
CISA
CISSP (or Associate)
GCED
GCIH
IAM Level 1 IAM Level II IAM Level III
CAP
GSLC
Security+ CE
CAP
CASP+ CE
CISM
CISSP (or Associate)
CISM
CISSP (or Associate)
GSLC
CCISO
IASAE 1 IASAE II IASAE III
CASP+ CE
CISSP (Or Associate)
CSSLP
CASP+ CE
CISSP (or Associate)
CSSLP
CISSP – ISSAP
CISSP – ISSEP
CSSP Analyst CSSP Infrastructure Support CSSP Incident Responder1
CEH
CFR
CCNA Cyber Ops
CCNA-Security
CySA+ **
GCIA
GCIH
GICSP
SCYBER
CEH
CySA+ **
GICSP
SSCP
CHFI
CFR
CFR
CEH
CFR
CCNA Cyber Ops
CCNA-Security
CHFI
CySA+ **
GCFA
GCIH
SCYBER
CSSP Auditor CSSP Manager1
CEH
CySA+ **
CISA
GSNA
CFR
CISM
CISSP-ISSMP
CCISO

 

DoD 8140: A New Focus on Cyber Security

Recently, officials realized there was a need to change the way the DoD handled information and network security. Changes in those technologies since 2004 and an increase in cyber attacks were the driving force behind this new directive. On August 11, 2015, the 8140 DoD directive was signed by representatives of the U.S. Department of Defense. Because of this change of focus, the “Information Assurance (IA) Workforce” has been renamed to the “Cybersecurity Workforce.”

DoD 8140 confirms the importance of popular IT certifications like A+, Network+, Security+, and CISSP as well as adding new approved baseline cyber security certifications including CASP, CEH, and more.

So is DoD 8570 really gone?

Not exactly. DoD Directive 8140 “reissues, renumbers, and cancels DoD Directive (DoDD) 8570.01 to update and expand established policies and assigned responsibilities for managing the DoD cyberspace workforce” according to the Information Assurance Support Environment site. Despite this, DoD 8140 currently uses the DoD 8570 manual.

DoD 8140 will eventually have its own manual, but it takes a few years to create complex manuals like this. For this reason, the DoD will continue using the 8570 manual, called 8570.01-M, for the time being. When a new manual is released for 8140 it will most likely replace 8570.01-M.

One of the major changes that DoD 8140 will bring about once its new manual is released is more of a focus on training that includes live, hands-on exercises. The DoD wanted to make sure that the certifications required for the Cybersecurity Workforce give their holders not just the knowledge, but also the know-how to defend the United States’ networks, digital assets, and information.

How might DoD 8140 affect you?

For many IT professionals, and those interested in IT, this presents a huge opportunity. With the DoD’s increased focus on cybersecurity, certified individuals are in high demand. DoD contractors operate all over the United States and even abroad, which makes it easy to take your credentials just about anywhere and get hired.

For those who are serving in the military, DoD 8140 (and 8570 before it) provides a way to gain valuable experience that translates directly into a lucrative civilian career. If you can work in the Cybersecurity Workforce during your service, you’ll come out of your military career with military clearance and certifications that will give you a huge head start in the civilian world.

For training companies (like LeaderQuest) and certification vendors alike, DoD 8140 is a huge call to action. This directive has made the importance of hands-on training and “live-fire drills” very clear. As a cyber security training company, we want to make sure that you’re well prepared to use your skills in the real world, and not leaving with just “book learning.”

Are you interested in joining the Cybersecurity Workforce?

There’s never been a better time to train in cyber security, whether or not you’re interested in working for the DoD. This industry currently has a huge shortage of qualified workers. In the U.S. alone, over 40,000 jobs for information security analysts are going unfilled every year, and employers are struggling to fill 200,000 other cyber security related roles, according to CyberSeek. With demand for these professionals at record levels, you can be sure that getting certified will pay off in spades.

The LeaderQuest cyber security school offers high-velocity IT training programs that can help you complete your information security certifications and be job-ready in weeks. Day and night class schedules make it easy for you to get the training you need fast in a way that works with your schedule. You won’t leave LeaderQuest with just a piece of paper. Our industry-expert instructors will make sure you have the knowledge you need to excel in a new job role, whether it’s through DoD 8570 or not.

Get started today, and make your new career a reality!

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12 Pros and Cons of Working for a Defense Contractor

12 Pros and Cons of Working for a Defense Contractor

Have you considered working for a defense contractor? Some of the largest defense contractors in the world are located in the United States! There are a lot of benefits to working in this industry, but it’s not all sunshine and roses. Below, we take a look at the benefits and drawbacks of private defense contractor jobs so that you can make a decision with all of the information you need.

Pros

1. Great Pay

Because of Directive 8570 (and 8140), those who work with secure information need certain baseline certifications such as Security+ to even start working. That means that defense contractors need these certified individuals to meet the requirements of their contracts, and they’re willing to pay top dollar for this kind of talent. It pays to get certified!

2. Put Your Security Clearance to Work

If you have an active security clearance, or have had one recently, you’ll be able to command higher pay from defense contractors. In fact, contractors with a security clearance earned $15,000 more than their government coworkers on average. And demand for these workers is only increasing as the US comes to terms with the dangers of cyber warfare and a crippling cyber security talent shortage. Your defense contractor salary could easily be as much as $83,000 for a Network Security Administrator, but even entry level defense contractor jobs can pay handsomely.

3. Good Education Benefits

Many defense contractors provide ample education benefits to keep their workers certified and compliant. Taking advantage of these benefits can help you build your career at an impressive pace as you continue to add new certifications to your resume.

While this is a common practice, be sure to examine your company’s policies, as many require that the employee continue to work for the company for a number of months after completing their class. You’ll want to plan ahead to make sure your timeline matches up perfectly.

4. Doing Work That Matters

By working in the defense industry, you could be protecting American cyberspace or creating the next generation of defense technology. The defense industry supports our military and the important work it does all over the world.

In recent years, it’s become clear how vulnerable companies and governments are to cyber attacks that can cripple infrastructure or steal valuable data. The defenses that we build today will safeguard us against cyber terror for years to come.

5. Working with Cutting-Edge Technology

The defense industry uses brand new technology that you can’t get access to anywhere else. While you may not want to live the life of a contractor forever, your time spent working with DoD contractors will give you irreplaceable experience.

Did you know that the internet was created by DARPA, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency? This is just one example of how defense technology eventually gets adopted for civilian uses. By working with the defense industry, you can use these technologies before they go mainstream!

6. Equal Pay for Everybody

The US Government mandates that all workers with a given position receive the same pay. This means that you can’t get paid less for being too old or too young, or for being a minority or a woman. If you get the job, you’ll get paid the same amount as everybody else in that job.

7. Work with Interesting People

Those who work for defense contractors come from diverse backgrounds. Many of them have had experience working in the armed forces and could tell you a story or two. Others have been studying and working with cutting-edge technology for years. If you want to surround yourself with people who are capable and smart, look no further.

Cons

8. Your Job Depends on Government Funding

The US Government is no slouch when it comes to defense spending, but that doesn’t mean your job has perfect security. As administrations change or national priorities shift, you could find that what you’re working on has been defunded. The company you work for may switch you to a different project, or all of your positions might be liquidated.

On the other hand, no industry offers 100% job security, and the skills and experience you gain will still hold their value.

9. Projects May Change at the Whim of the Administration

Similar to the point above, you may find that the project you’ve devoted all of your blood, sweat, and tears to is no longer a priority for the administration. This could be caused by political differences, changing national priorities, or external factors such as cost or economic shifts.

While your project might not be outright defunded, its focus could be altered to suit the changing winds. Work that had been completed might be scrapped or repurposed. For most, this kind of change might be stressful but would still be better than losing your job.

10. Your Contract May Be Purchased by Another Company

Even if your project continues to receive funding and support, it may be purchased by another company. When this happens, you might stay with your current company and be reassigned to another project, or you could get hired by the company that’s taking over the contract and be asked to stay on that project. New employees of the company taking over the project essentially have to start over and may have to negotiate pay rate and benefits.

11. You May Face More Criticism

If you work with employees of the government, you’ll find that you’re vulnerable to a lot more criticism. Government employees are protected from losing their jobs unless they really make huge mistakes. Contractors, on the other hand, are easy to fire and don’t have the same kind of security. It can be frustrating to see coworkers who’re just “going through the motions” with no problem while you get criticized for every little thing. Of course, this depends on the kind of position you have and the company you work for.

12. You’ll Need to Pass a Background Check

For many people this isn’t a big deal, but for others it may be an issue. Just know that any defense contractor will want a background check as a condition of employment. A background check may include employment, education, criminal records, credit history, motor vehicle and license record checks. You’ll probably also need to take a drug test, so keep that in mind.

Interested in Working for a Defense Contractor?

LeaderQuest can help! We offer IT certification courses to help you get your Security+, CEH, CISSP, and other certifications that can be your foot in the door to get hired by a defense contractor. Our courses take 5-10 days, are taught by instructors with real industry experience, and LeaderQuest covers the cost of one certification attempt per class. After you’re certified, our Career Services team will make it their #1 goal to get you hired!

Are you ready to start training for your future?

 

Q&A: Using Your Post 9/11 Benefit to Get the Job & The Pay You Want

Q&A: Using Your Post 9/11 Benefit to Get the Job & The Pay You Want

We’ve got a special place in our hearts for veterans who’ve served to keep our country and our freedoms safe.

So much so that we dedicate an entire department of our company to working with veterans and their families helping them figure out the technical education and IT training they need to get on their desired IT career path once they leave the armed services.

One of the biggest things we’ve noticed when Veterans come to us is that there’s a lot of confusion when it comes to:

  • How to know which jobs you qualify for as a veteran
  • What technical education path and certifications can best elevate your current military skills and background to qualify you for CURRENT job openings
  • How to get the most out of your Post 9/11 Benefits

Competition in the commercial world doesn’t make it much better, either. It’s a place where even the most high-ranking military titles don’t carry as much weight as we’d like them to, and where entry-level salaries can be more cut-throat than you’d like to deal with.

So, to help you wade through the confusion and frustration, we got our IT Career Training Services team to answer some of the most common, frustrating questions veterans have about taking the next step in their career path after leaving the military.

Because after serving our country the way that you did? You deserve the IT career of your dreams!

Q: Why do so many job listings require skills that I don’t have? Where can I use the skills I learned in the Army?

Positions and working skills required for the army are very specialized.

And while they require time, study and practice to learn and not everyone can do them, they are so specialized to one career path; which often means they’re not directly applicable to working from a cubicle, for example.

Jobs in the Department of Defense might be a good choice, since they’re typically better at helping veterans transfer their skill sets than corporate organizations.


Q: Do you mean I have to start from the bottom, even after I reached _______ rank in the army?

While you may not have to start from the absolute bottom (like an unpaid college-level internship), chances are you won’t land the job you’re after right away. Most corporate promotion strategies are based on merit, and a lot of hiring in the corporate world happens from within.

So, yes, you might need to get your foot in the door with a lower-level position than you’d initially like, but the good news is you can use the discipline and focus you learned in the military to quickly prove yourself better than your peers, pushing you up the promotion ladder.


Q: Do I have to do two to four years in a college before I can get some kind of degree to prove myself?

No!

As long as the educational institution is approved by the VA (LeaderQuest is!), you can use your Post 9/11 Benefit to pay for any kind of job-based training, so you don’t have to waste your time sitting in classes about world literature if you’d rather work in technology.

In fact, many of our career-ready, VA-approved technical training programs are quite short. The I.T. training program we most recommend for veterans who want to begin their IT career is only 23 days, for example.

Take a look at our Degree vs. Certification article to see pros and cons of each path.


Q: I think I might want to work in IT, but how do I choose an IT career path, let alone a training program?

IT is a great choice. It’s one of the fastest-growing sectors and provides more and more high-paying jobs every single year.

Since most veterans don’t already have a working background in IT, we recommend our Computer User Support Specialist Training. It gives you all the fundamentals you need to start a solid career path, and gives you what you need to pass THREE CompTIA certifications (A+, Network+, and Security+), which around 80% of IT employers look at as an advantage.

(We also love that it only takes 23 days to complete.)

The three certifications also fill levels one and two of the security requirements for Department of Defense Directive 8570, if you decide you’d like to work for them.


Q: If I can’t get the salary I want right away, what kind of salary can I expect?

This highly depends on the field of work you go into. Teaching is vastly different from marketing, which is vastly different from IT. (Not to mention all the other endless possibilities.)

But since we specialize in helping veterans transition into the IT field, we’ll answer for those interested in IT.

Based on our research from O*Net Online, we’ve found that Computer Support Technicians (an entry-level position you can obtain with our training) that have the CompTIA A+, Network+, and Security+ certifications earn between $46,000 to $66,000 per year, depending on location.

This is still above the national average, which was $44,888 in 2013.


So… What Should I Do Next?

How you use your Post 9/11 Benefit is totally up to you and what your post-military career goals are.

If you know what your dream career is, identify the qualifications it has and figure out what kind of training program you need to get your foot in the door of a company that can help lead you there.

If you’re still not sure what you’d like to do, we have a veteran resources center you can check out. Get in touch and we can answer all of YOUR questions and help you help figure out exactly what you want, how to get there, and how to use your Post 9/11 Benefit to help!